Anyone else interested in hardware developments?

In The Name of Zod

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I love hardware tech talk and I am fascinated mostly by inventive tech's. Right now I am interested in AMD's infinity cache and what this will bring to the graphics side of gaming. Recently I heard that they are interested in buying Xilinix which makes me wonder what AMD have planned for that tech. Then there is nVidia's acquisition of ARM holding's, this has obvious benefits. Also Intel is ditching their own fabs now, they are easing themselves into these waters which I don't know if it's good or bad for that company but it's clear that it's over for their fab dominance. Anyone else here find hardware tech talk interesting or have something to say on this?
 

In The Name of Zod

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No problem, if you want it simplified here it is nice and clear. The most under-rated person in tech today is Mark Papermaster . Just have a look at the disruptive technologies he has been behind. Right now he is behind AMD which is the growth tech stock of our decade.
 
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The Noodle Compound
AMD's Big Navi is set to launch on October 28th, I'm wondering how that will stand up to/affect Nvidia's 3000 series cards that just came out. Not to mention The Ryzen 5000 series processors right around the corner on 11/5. I'm been watching a few of the tech guys on youtube, namely Jayztwocents. but other's include Paul's Hardware, and Linus to name a few.
 

In The Name of Zod

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Big Navi will be very interesting I think, especially with cryptocurrencies on the rise again people are starting to talk about gpu shortages. This will likely push the prices up for anyone looking to upgrade with the next generation of cards coming out. That said however, with Intel now moving into the discrete GPU market it should also be interesting to see what effect that extra supply of graphics silicon will have in general. Could be a bumpy ride? This whole thing might also effect ram prices down the line too.

Update(20th Oct 2020): Looks like AMD are counting on Blockchain to move silicon
 
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jmervyn

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Anyone else here find hardware tech talk interesting or have something to say on this?
Well, I barely missed getting a "D" in electrical engineering when I changed my undergraduate major to Computer Engineering... so not very much.

However, I *am* quite interested by new technologies like pebble bed nuclear reactors, that new fusion reactor thingy that is apparently successful, and what not. About the most interesting thing in that vein aside from quantum computing (which I still can't really grasp and am not overly interested in grasping) was the concept of algae as computer memory.

I don't recall reading anything in the past couple of years about the algae, so I assume it was either a dead end, or more likely couldn't rival the improvements being made in miniaturization of silicon-based (which doubtless are part of what you're so excited about.).
 

In The Name of Zod

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You are talking about wetware or organic computers, correct? I like the idea of chemical computers more personally, recently I've begun to wonder how an atomic computer or fusion computer could work. That being the process of creating an atom to program it with a problem then somehow leveraging the energy that comes out of it when breaking it open to process data. The processing power would be insane. Obviously not within our technological capabilities today but maybe one day which makes it very academically interesting. Not something you are likely going to be able to look up anyhow.

I also spend a lot of time wondering how on earth we could make deep screen monitors, its a real puzzler that one. I keep thinking about how mirrors work and how simple they are but also how hard they are to make a digital or even analog equivalent. Even a small scale one would require processing an immense amount of data. Which leads me back to wondering about chemical processing data at the very point of light creation on the surface of the monitor. Sending 3D data packets to the screen and processing it there instead of on a gpu. Since creating a sense of depth is going to require sending light out in multiple directions from each single pixel and let the human brain do its triangulation thingy to perceive the depth of the image.
 

jmervyn

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You are talking about wetware or organic computers, correct?
I don't know if 'wetware' is a valid term, but I've heard it referred to as 'organic computing'. I don't think it's contrary to the concept of 'quantum computing' but I'll admit that's a field that confused the hell out of me (and I can understand how PKI encryption works).

As for 'deep screen' I suspect it's not as difficult a challenge; it would involve layered screens similar to the legitimate holograph tech already in use. All that's required is a way to get the light to reflect off of specific areas; it works with both water & vapor already. I mean, the old 'holograph' like the Tupac appearance is nearly a decade old...


Reaching the point that it would work with a detailed display is another matter entirely.
 

In The Name of Zod

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Yeah, I understood PKI about 15 years ago but now that you brought it up I had to go and youtube it. Basically the public key can't decrypt the message, you need the private key. The deepscreen stuff is more like this. The looking glass solution is not real time though, you need to compile/build your image to go on the hardware.

There is definitely a future in organic computing imho, developing hardware that can store the amount of data that the human brain can hold is pretty much impossible without filling up a city with just hard drives. Even then a human brain is going to be insanely more energy and space efficient. I used to read that the human brain could store up to a yottabyte or was it the one lower. Since then they have down graded us to the petabyte scale. :poop: (edit: I think they used to rate us as having 2.5 zettabytes of potential storage in our brain mass, as in dna/kg)

DNA computing is pretty interesting too however going by the history of scientific discoveries to commercial use timespan goes we probably won't be seeing anything come of it until next century.
 

jmervyn

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Yeah, I understood PKI about 15 years ago but now that you brought it up I had to go and youtube it. Basically the public key can't decrypt the message, you need the private key.
When I wrote, "understand" I probably should have specified, "understand, troubleshoot & debug"... I've been trying to figure out a better analogy using playing cards than the 'Bob & Mary' method shown in that clip, in order to explain it to customers. Worse yet is trying to wrap one's head around the way that Diffie-Hellman works (it was on the playlist for the clip you cited).

Plus, as the Brit from the Diffie-Hellman clip indicates, it's stuffed full of mathematics in addition to cryptography. Therefore, it's boring as snail snot.
 

jmervyn

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Do you need to explain the math, as in how modulo is used in the equation too?
On occasion - not to users, of course, but for certifications - but I really, truly suck at math.

I've also had to mentally calculate IP subnets without using a scratch sheet. I know y'all would laugh your asses off at me mumbling & seemingly counting on my fingers.
 
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In The Name of Zod

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On occasion - not to users, of course, but for certifications - but I really, truly suck at math.

I've also had to mentally calculate IP subnets without using a scratch sheet. I know y'all would laugh your asses off at me mumbling & seemingly counting on my fingers.
You are not the only one. I constantly have to relearn everything I was taught in high school. Math, like programming languages just don't stick unless you use it often. Maybe you should get an abacus? :coffee: Personally, I use what ever I can get my hands on if it makes the job easier. I tried to duct tape a hole in my gutter a couple of weeks ago, needless to say it was probably the dumbest thing I have done in years.
 
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jmervyn

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Maybe you should get an abacus? :coffee:
I've got one. I've probably forgotten how to use it (j/k).
Personally, I use what ever I can get my hands on if it makes the job easier. I tried to duct tape a hole in my gutter a couple of weeks ago, needless to say it was probably the dumbest thing I have done in years.
Hole probably needed to be on the inside. I've not tried the "Flex-Seal" product but it's supposed to be usable from the outside.

YouTube used to be an incredible resource - In the past I've looked up plumbing, tile & grout, assorted small engine & automobile repair. Lots of stuff taken down now, of course - gardening is still pretty safe.

That's what's so sad about the way corporatism/fascism/progressivism/choose-your-ism has affected social media. The most incredible resource & data store - to say nothing of education & entertainment - in history, and all the damned Gov't/corporate interests are trying to prevent or charge fees for access.

Did you know that the original American concept of Intellectual Property rights was limited to 14 years plus a 14 year renewal? While they were fully familiar with the concept of automatic weapons, I doubt they ever would have imagined a world in which trolls use copyright 'strikes' on YouTube or political agents restrict historical opinion videos because of anti-Semitism & anti-Christian bigotry.
 

krischan

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You are not the only one. I constantly have to relearn everything I was taught in high school. Math, like programming languages just don't stick unless you use it often. Maybe you should get an abacus? :coffee: Personally, I use what ever I can get my hands on if it makes the job easier. I tried to duct tape a hole in my gutter a couple of weeks ago, needless to say it was probably the dumbest thing I have done in years.
Which kind of dumbest outcome in years may a hole in the gutter or a fixing attempt produce?

I'm not sure if even duct tape will stick well enough... and yes, it's to be applied at the inside. Clean and dry it and try to close it with a blowtorch and a bit of tar. Bigger holes or small cracks may need tar paper. Really big ones need a new gutter.

You have a zinc gutter, right?
 

In The Name of Zod

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It's not aluminum, its a regular steel one. I am planning on new guttering. All of my down-pipe connections have completely rusted out around the join. The inside of the gutter was full of rust so each time I got the brush out to clean some away I just made the hole bigger. It's almost a foot long now. This is going to cost.
 

jmervyn

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You ought to explore gutter 'helmets' or 'shields' while you're at it. Worth every penny not to haul my aged rear up on the roof twice a year...
 

In The Name of Zod

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Yeah, not a bad idea. I'll have to work out how to separate my gutter from my neightbours as its a duplex and their leaves always flow onto my side when it rains. Probably just put some kind of grill/filter in place or something. Looking forward to having this behind me. Also have got a rusty gully (where the roof meets at 90 degrees). Might have to pull up some of the roof to replace it too. Do they make aluminum gullys?